English

TRAVEL TIPS

What is it? How to eat it?

When traveling to an unknown country you take chances to meet with meals of a local cuisine which will be so different from the ones you got used to that this is absolutely unclear ­ "how to eat it". Some tourists prefer not to risk and choose well­known food. But there are someone who dream of new thrills but nevertheless don't want to risk one's health. So exactly for them we want to describe a number of exotic dishes and meals that can be met in different countries.

  • What is it? How to eat it?
    Durian ­ a fruit growing in some Asian countries. It's remarkable for a so specific smell (to be honest ­ stink) that it's not allowed in many public places. But if you plug your nose, overcome quite natural loathing and try durian you will understand why it got a title of "king of fruits".
  • What is it? How to eat it?What is it? How to eat it?
    Dumplings (knedliku) – dough balls, probably the most popular dish of Czech cuisine. It's worth trying for sure. Just remember: dumplings themselves are not that tastes bad, it's tasteless. Therefore it's better to eat them dipped in sauces.
    Carambola – not only delicious but a very beautiful fruit, being bisected it resembles a five- pointed star. There are a variety of ways how to eat this miracle: with or without skins, fresh or pickled, separately or on salads. Also carambola is a base for a very delicious jam and an ingredient for cocktails, smoothies and sorbets.
  • What is it? How to eat it?
    Bloody tongue – very tasty but not as popular German snack. It is made from marinated beef tongue, which is cooked, cooled and then twisted into a roll. "Nothing special" you'll say. And will be absolutely wrong. Because this dish is cooked with a supplement of blood and anise that give it a special piquancy. If you look at haggis you'll probably think that it is Scottish bagpipe bellows. In fact, this is a Scottish delicacy, tastiest dish from undeservedly despised offal (heart, liver, lamb lungs) flavored with bacon, onion, herbs and oat flour. Traditionally haggis is served on January 25 ­ birthday is Robert Berns.
  • What is it? How to eat it?
    In Japan and Korea thrill seekers can try sanakcha soup ­ very tasty octopus. It is cut and dropped into a broth at the last moment, so that tentacles in a plate are still moving. `but be careful: suckers on tentacles can “glue” to the throat and simply throttle a consumer. In restaurant Noma in Copenhagen you can taste a salad with frozen alive ants and cream­fish. Ants contain many trace elements so there will be definitely the profit of it. The main thing is to eat it quickly ­ until ants not thawed out and run away from the plate. Coconut soup with a bat ­ one more exotic dish which is often offered in restaurants of Thailand, Indonesia and Singapore. And everything would be fine but unexpectedly they throw a mouse into boiling water just a few seconds before serving the dish, so that you have to eat it almost alive. According to local tradition it’s supposed to be eaten entirely (with a skin), excluding just bones and teeth. Well, and for the fans of less exotic but assuredly fresh dishes we recommend to try sashimi ikidzukuri. For its preparation fish will be pulled out of aquarium in your sight (sometimes they will even offer a guest to choose a fish he likes), gutted and immediately served with rice.

What is it? How to eat it?